Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Making fun of white women?



More than likely by now you've seen this new Sun Drop ad a few times. I hadn't seen it in a while (due to fast forwarding past commercials with TiVo) but last night something hit me.

Is this ad trying to score on the stereotypes that white women can't dance and that white women have small butts (and therefore don't have much to drop)?

I mean let's face it if Sun Drop had used a black or latin woman for this it probably would not have gone over as funny (in fact I'm betting people would be quick to say that such an ad would be objectifying to said women). But I'm neither white nor woman so its not like I have a real say in it.

Just wondering if people think that this isn't a big deal because its poking white women. (You know that belief that a lot of people hold but no one wants to admit, the though that having what some perceive as privilege in some places actually negates dis-privileges.)

So what do you (and I'm especially interested in hearing from white women on this one) think about it? Feel free to bring up any other ads that you think fall in this category (ads that poke fun at a certain group of people but is seen as okay because that group is okay to poke at on that subject).

4 comments:

Toysoldier said...

I see I was not the only one to think that this was meant as a joke about white women. However, I think it is an expanded joke about white people in general as most of the vignettes she "drops" it through are filled with white people. If that does not do it, then certainly the crunked-out faceless voice gets the message across.

Danny said...

You're probably right about it expanding to the whole "white people can't dance" thing. And don't forget the white guy at the end that's like, "So that's how you drop it." and begins trying to dance.

April said...

As a white woman, I'm more embarrassed than offended. That just looked ridiculous.

But, no; I don't really think that this commercial is offensive to white women. I think this has to do with the whole power thing, because white people have institutional power and therefore, making fun of them isn't necessarily threatening, whereas it could be seen that way if the subject were a minority.

I don't think that gives race-based jokes about white people a free pass, necessarily, as it's still often hurtful and discriminatory, but in this context, it hardly even registers on my personal "I'm offended!" scale.

Danny said...

Okay April I understand that your thoughts on this carry more weight than mine but this....
I think this has to do with the whole power thing, because white people have institutional power and therefore, making fun of them isn't necessarily threatening, whereas it could be seen that way if the subject were a minority.
.....seems odd to me. This reminds me of how people (mostly women I notice) like to sweep in and declare when something is sexist against men. They even do the whole, "its offensive but its not sexist because men have power" (which basically translates into "its bad but its not THAT bad" or "yeah its bad but women have it worse" or "the negative of this is washed out by the positives from something else" or etc.....). In short trying pull in all the straws they can find from anywhere possible to speak on an experience and feeling that they probably don't know.

I don't think that gives race-based jokes about white people a free pass, necessarily, as it's still often hurtful and discriminatory, but in this context, it hardly even registers on my personal "I'm offended!" scale.
Fair enough, its your race not mine. I just think that if we want to deal with racism we can't go around taking things that clearly tap on race and declaring them not that big a deal.

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